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Old 12-11-2008, 00:06
The Hamster The Hamster is offline
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Regulator/Rectifier HOW TO!

OK! SO... Here it is. A simple, Easy to follow Diagnostics and Repair Guide for the common Regulator Rectifier problem associated with the VFR400's.

The below information is a guide only, and is word of my experience. It is NOT Ofiicial by any means and I shall not be held responsible for any errors or damages caused by the use of this guide. (Sorry, thats Legal B******T.)

Also, please observe that the information is for a Honda VFR400R NC30 R3K-L Model as worked on. Im sure that the information is as accurate on the likes of the NC24 and NC35 etc, but then, I cannot be so sure.


Diagnostics.
The common symptoms of a failed Regulator Rectifier are:
-Battery goes flat minutes after use and does not hold a charge.
-The bike refuses to start and the Starter Relay gives off a whirring/clicking sound due to lack of power.
-The headlights and indicators may flicker and be brighter than normal occasionally when the machine is Ticking over.
-The Bike will not tick over properly, or noticeable feels down on power when riding.
-The bike will run only when jump started.

To check these symptoms accurately and to distinguish the faults between a broken alternator or a fault with the Regulator/Rectifier:

Start by checking the battery voltage, at 5000 revs you should get about 13.5 volts.

The three yellow wires from the alternator to the Reg/rec as seen in the pictures above should show a voltage of about 50 volts. Rember that is AC not DC voltage. Just put one of your probes from your multimeter on one of the yellow wire terminals and the other on one of the other yellow wire terminals, you should have a reading about 50 volts. Now just swap the probes to the other wires and you should in the end have three readings, one for each wire. You are really looking for even reading from all three wires. If not the alternator is defective, one of the coils has broken down.


Im sure there are many more symptoms, and please, feel free to add comments of these below the guide and I will update the guide with them included.


Repair!The repair for this problem is VERY VERY EASY. I cannot stress it enough! Let me explain.

You Will Need:
You will need the following tools and parts to satisfactorily complete the replacement of the regulator/rectifier.

-New Regulator Rectifier PN# 31600-MV4-010 (Note: Make sure the new unit has cooling fins on it to aid in its longevity)

-New Battery PN# CTX7A-BS (You will find that the battery will no longer hold a charge or maintain a satisfactory power once the regulator has malfunctioned and so replacement will be required)

-1x Large Flat Blade Screwdriver for removing the 6 fairing bolts. (This is required as long as the Original bolts or similar are used. You may find that the bolts on your own machine have been changed at some point, and so you will need the necassary tool other than this to remove them)
-1x 10mm Spanner or Socket on long extension bar. (to undo the bolts on the Regulator and the battery if required)
-1x medium Sized Phillips Screwdriver. (To remove/replace the bolts on the battery.)



Thats it! The job should take an amatuer mechanic around 30minutes to complete at a casual pace.

To Do:
Firstly, It is common sense to advise that work should only be carried out in a well lit and spacious environment which is dry and free of dirt. (I know my pictures are at night, but i had no other choice as I have work during the day and I also used a 500w Halogen light and was accompanied by another person. Dad. lol) I should advise having somebody nearby to supervise should you feel it necassary.

Right, Position your bike on the side stand on level ground. Put your tools and new parts somewhere nearby so they are to hand when you need them.
The first thing to do is to remove the pillion seat and put it to one side.

Carefully remove the 6 large Fairing bolts securing the rear fairing unit into place and gently lift the rear of the unit out of the rubber holders by the back of the pillion seat.

To do this, simple hold the whole unit under the rear light and apply a small upwards pressure until it pops out of the rubber mountings.
At this point, you will need to unclip the rear light wire connection so you can remove the unit as a whole. The connection is located on the left hand side of the bike as you look from the back of the machine and is very close to the metal framework of the pillion seat support/lock.

Once the connection is apart, you can gently lift the whole seating/fairing unit away from the bike and put it on soft ground to avoid damaging it. Be careful of damaging the paintwork at this stage, and be sure to widen the fairing a little at the front as you remove it to make room for it to go around the fuel tank and the covers and items around the battery box.

The next step is to diconnect the battery and remove it from the bike. This must be done as a safety precaution to avoid electrocution and fire risks. Make sure the Negative battery terminal is removed from the battery FIRST.
The regulator rectifier is situated just above and in front of the left hand side pillion footpeg, again looking from the rear of the machine towards the front.

It is held in simple by two 10mm nuts and the electrical connection plug. You will find it a lot easier to remove the unit from the frame before disconnecting the plug. Once done, you can discard the Old regulator Rectifier.


Now, thats as far as you need to go dismantling the machine, lets get it back together!!

Connect the New regulator rectifier to the plug and then tighten it back up to the frame. Make sure the wiring is neat and tidy against the Rectifier and the appropriate cable holders are used, as it can cause problems if its in the way at time of refitting the fairng/seat unit.

Put your new Battery into the holder under the seat and connect it back up, making sure the negative terminal is connected LAST. Be sure to refit the battery strap if there is one.
(You may at this point wish to try starting the bike to check it is working and there is no earthing or connection fault.)

Now to put the fairing back on, you will need to put the front down first, and then slide it forwards so that the riders seat clips under the fuel tank rubber stop. Make sure no wires are getting trapped or rubbed by the fairing as you put it back on, and connect the rear light plug together so they work aswell.
then you simply push the rear of the unit back down into the rubber holes as you can see on the bike, and tighten up all of the 6 fairing screws that were removed in the beginning. These screws only need to be hand tight and should not be force tightened. you may find that using the bike in the different temperatures and conditions that these bolts will go extremely tight and be very difficult to remove again in the future. I would advise using some copper slip, but it shouldn't be necassary and can get a little messy.

Final thing then, is to replace the pillion seat and admire your perfectly running motorbike again. You should be problem free for as long as you own the bike now really, as the new Regulator rectifier should have the cooling fins and is not prone to having problems.



I hope you all find this very helpful and that i have been of some use! If there is any more information you would like or you feel you have something to add to the guide, then please let me know and I will update this thread where necassary. Also, if you would like some more detailed and clearer photos then also let me know as this can easily be arranged.

Many thanks to themaster and MickCheese for there information and input towards this thread.

The Hamster

Last edited by The Hamster; 22-11-2008 at 17:12.
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Old 12-11-2008, 23:37
themaster themaster is offline
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Nice posting. Just to point out one thing, which is most certainly accidental...

When you disconnect the battery, the negative (black) lead comes off first. When you reconnect the battery, the black lead goes on last, otherwise you get plenty of sparkage.
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Old 13-11-2008, 18:35
The Hamster The Hamster is offline
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Thankyou for the correction themaster. I have modified the walk-through as necassary.
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Old 19-11-2008, 21:04
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MickCheese MickCheese is offline
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A very good guide but a faulty alternator will give very similar symptoms so my advice is to run a few tests before shelling out over 100 for a battery and reg/rec.

Checking the electrics is quite easy, all you need is a cheap multimeter.

Mick
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Old 19-11-2008, 21:10
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MickCheese MickCheese is offline
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Diagnostics

Start by checking the battery voltage, at 5000 revs you should get about 13.5 volts.

The three yellow wires from the alternator to the Reg/rec as seen in the pictures above should show a voltage of about 50 volts. Rember that is AC not DC voltage. Just put one of your probes from your multimeter on one of the yellow wire terminals and the other on one of the other yellow wire terminals, you should have a reading about 50 volts. Now just swap the probes to the other wires and you should in the end have three readings, one for each wire. You are really looking for even reading from all three wires. If not the alternator is defective, one of the coils has broken down.

Mick
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Old 22-11-2008, 17:11
The Hamster The Hamster is offline
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Thankyou very much Mick. Ive edited your information into the guide and it is now more accurate.


Perhaps this could be made into a sticky for members to take note of?

The Hamster
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